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Keep up the amazing work, and have tremendous hatzlochah!”

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Tes Zayin Iyar, 5777

Whatever Works

"Why on earth are we in a plastic fish tank on the ocean?!

"This tank isn't registered with the coast guard, its materials don't meet EPA standards, we don't even have a license to drive it amongst many other state and federal regulations that prohibit us from riding in this fish tank on the Atlantic Ocean?!"

"My Son; the reason is that we are presently experiencing Hurricane Sandy which hit us harder than we expected. We had to save our lives with whatever means were available and this had to do."

Torah study may not be ideal when there is a lack of time, money, patience or other regulations besides the regular expectations you have from your life. However, due to the critical nature Torah learning is, it has to happen with the circumstances as they are.


Tes Zayin Iyar, 5777

Extraterrestrial Intelligence

Segment 5 of 5

Science fiction is replete with stories of human contact with intelligent extraterrestrial creatures. Although we have established that Torah accepts the possibility of extraterrestrial life, we have yet to explore whether Torah lends credence to the concept of extraterrestrial intelligence. If some type of life form exists on other planets, does it consist of intelligent creatures with free will who possess the ability to make decisions? Were they given commandments to fulfill, just as we must follow Torah and mitzvos?

The first to mention this question was R. Yehudah ben Barzilai of Barcelona. In his commentary to Sefer Yetzirah, he elaborates on the possibility of the existence of other worlds (see the second installment in this series), and he mentions that "perhaps Hashem did not give a Torah in these worlds." He also remains uncertain whether the creatures inhabiting these worlds possess a yetzer hara and the possibility to sin, or if they are angels, spirits, or similar entities.

(It should be noted that according to R. Yehudah, these other worlds are not planets or stars in the heavens surrounding our world. Rather, they are distinct universes, each world surrounded by seven heavens, just like ours.)

R. Pinchas Eliyahu Horowitz of Vilna (see the fourth installment of this series) also addresses this question. In his opinion, although extraterrestrial creatures may possess intellect, they are not bestowed with free will, and accordingly, they were not given the Torah either. They do not serve Hashem, and Hashem does not derive pleasure from their actions. Just like everything else in the universe, including the loftiest and most spiritual worlds, they were created solely for us, the inhabitants of this physical and mundane world.

R. Pinchas quotes the statement of Chazal in Berachos (32b): "Hashem said to Knesses Yisroel: 'My daughter! I have created twelve mazalos in the heavens. Each mazal is comprised of thirty chayil. Each chayil, in turn, consists of thirty ligyon. Each ligyon includes thirty rahaton; each rahaton-thirty karton, and each karton-thirty gastera. Within each gastera I suspended 3,650,000,000 stars. And the only reason I created all of these heavenly bodies was for you!!'"

In a conversation with Professor Branover, the Rebbe elaborated on the idea that extraterrestrial creatures do not possess free will. The concept of free will, the Rebbe explained, is a paradox; since everything that occurs below is orchestrated from Above, seemingly no creature should have the ability to choose how to act. The credit for this incredible ability is thanks to Torah. Hashem wants us to fulfill the Torah's directives on our own accord, and He therefore granted us with free will. This leads us to conclude that the existence of free will is contingent on being given the Torah.

Can we posit that other worlds were given a Torah as well? No, said the Rebbe; that would be impossible. We cannot say they were given a different Torah, because Torah is truth, and there can only be a single truth. Neither can we say they were given the same Torah as us, because the Torah describes the giving of the Torah in great detail, and these details are essential to the Torah itself. This leaves no room for doubt as to the location-the only location-where it took place. And since Torah was not given elsewhere, free will does not exist elsewhere either.

All this was said in response to Professor Branover's question: "According to the Torah, is it possible that other civilizations exist outside of Planet Earth?" For a civilization to exist, the Rebbe answered, it must be comprised of intelligent creatures who possess free will. As stated above, free will cannot exist anywhere outside of our planet. Therefore, although there are sources in Torah indicating that extraterrestrial life may exist, otherworldly civilizations with intelligent creatures do not.

Sources:

Pirush Sefer Yetzirah LeRebbi Yehudah Bartzeloni (pp. 226-228, new ed.). Sefer Habris, Section 1, 3:4. Mah Rabu Maasecha Hashem, pp. 213-214

"Increase in Torah - Increase in Life" Tes Zayin Iyar, 5777

.. We find ourselves now in the days preceding [Shavuos, the festival of] receiving the Torah, which brings healing to the world as a whole and the Jewish people - the receivers of the Torah - in particular.

In light of that which is known - that in a more particular sense we receive the Torah anew every day, as emphasized by the fact that the phrase "Giver of the Torah" is in present tense - we understand that a Jew must be healthy and whole each and every day. In the words of the Rambam: "Maintaining a healthy and whole body is an integral part of Divine service."

.. Surely I need not motivate you to influence your son to establish set times for the study of the inner portion of Torah (pnimiyus haTorah), which in our generation has been revealed in Toras HaChassidus.

Every increase in Torah and mitzvos, and surely adding to the study of pnimiyus haTorah, which is termed in the Zohar the "soul of Torah," greatly increases G-d's blessings for all of one's personal needs, both for the life of the body as well as for the life of the soul.

All rights reserved to chabad.org. From Igros Kodesh, Vol. XVII, p. 129
Originally adapted by S.B. Wineberg in his book Healthy in Body Mind & Spirit - Vol. 1


Beis Iyar, 5777

Wisdom Behind the Curtain

Throughout the ages, we find great women who have been respected Torah scholars. Although they have been the exception rather than the rule, they attest to the exalted heights women can attain through Torah study.

The renowned Sefardic Torah giant, Rabbi Chayim Yosef David Azulai (known as Chida, 1724-1806) in his bibliographic work Shem Gdolim, has a special listing for "Rabbanit" ("Rebbetzin")!

He quotes the Talmud (Megilla 14a) that the Jewish people had seven prophetesses: Sarah, Miriam, Devora, Chana, Avigayil, Chulda and Esther (Rashi, on Bereishis says that all the Matriarchs were prophetesses).

The Chida mentions the renowned Bruria, daughter of Rabbi Chanina ben Tradyon and wife of Rabbi Meir (both Tannaim -- Sages mentioned in the Mishna). The Talmud says she would review 300 teachings of 300 Torah masters in a single day! She knew so much that she could express her own opinion in questions of Halachic law, disagreeing with respected Tannaim, while others endorsed her opinion.

So authoritative was Bruria considered, that eminent Tannaim would reverently quote how she rebuked them for not adhering properly to the teachings of the Sages.

On occasion she would even rebuke students for poor learning habits, giving as her source her interpretation of a scriptural verse, an interpretation that the Talmud later quoted.

Rashi had three daughters -- and no sons. Besides marrying renowned Torah scholars, they were known to be outstandingly knowledgeable in Torah. Once, Rashi lay sick, with no strength to write a profound and complicated Halachic reply to a query he had received. He therefore asked his daughter Rachel to write it. This may mean that he dictated it to her; even so, it reveals Rashi's confidence in her ability to accurately transcribe the complicated subject matter, for which she must have been a considerable scholar.

MaHaRShal, Rabbi Shlomo Luria (c. 1510-1573), one of the greatest Torah authorities in a generation of great luminaries, writes of an ancestress of his, some seven generations back.

"The Rabbanit Miriam, daughter of the Gaon Rabbi Shlomo Shapiro and sister of Rabbi Peretz of Kostenitz, of a continuous line of Torah scholars tracing its ancestry to Rashi...who had her own Yeshiva, where she would sit with a curtain intervening, while she lectured in Halacha before young men who were outstanding Torah scholars"!

Nor was this phenomenon confined to the Ashkenazi lands where the prevailing non-Jewish mores were more tolerant of women in positions of prominence.

Rabbi Pesachya of Regensburg, Germany (c. 1120-1190), one of the Baalei Tosafot contemporary with Rambam, traveled extensively, and an account of his travels still exists. In Baghdad -- where, as a Moslem city, they were far stricter in such matters -- he observed that, for reasons of modesty, "no woman would be seen there [outside], and no one would enter the home of another man so as not to meet his wife."

Rabbi Shmuel Halevi ben Ali, Rosh Yeshiva of Baghdad in those days, had an only daughter known to be expert in both Tanach and Talmud. Despite the extraordinary prevailing emphasis on modesty, she would teach young men Tanach! She would sit indoors near a window through which she could be heard, while her male students would listen outside on a lower level where they could not see her!

Another woman of this period who is recorded as being Torah knowledgeable was Dulce, the saintly wife of Rabbi Elazar of Worms (1160-1238), renowned author of Sefer Rokeach and other works and one of the greatest "Chasidei Ashkenaz" (the pious German Kabbalists of the 12th-13th centuries).

Together with her two daughters, she died a martyr's death in 1197 at the hands of Crusaders who entered their home and murdered them in her husband's presence. He mourned her in a touching elegy in which he describes her as extremely pious and wise, hospitable to the Torah scholars, expert in the rules of Torah prohibitions, and as one who would preach every Shabbat -- to women, we assume.

Historians mention other women of this period who were very knowledgeable in Torah. Usually they are known only by the Torah books they wrote in the Yiddish vernacular for other women to study, or for their translations of classic Torah works into Yiddish.

The Previous Lubavitcher Rebbe of blessed memory writes, "Several women in the generations of the Tannaim and Amoraim, and also in generations closer to us, were knowledgeable in Torah." The Rebbe might have had in mind his ancestress Perel, the scholarly wife of the renowned Maharal, Rabbi Yehuda Liva ben Betzalel of Prague (1512- 1609).

The Maharal was ten years old when he was engaged to Perel, who was then six (this was common practice at the time). Realizing his great genius, she immediately decided to work hard at studying Torah so that she would never be an embarrassment to such a great husband.

She once said that, from the age of eight, no day passed when she did not spend at least five hours studying Torah! Perel arranged and redacted all 24 of her husband's renowned works. It is said that in no less than eight places she found errors in his works where he had misquoted either Talmudic Sages, or Rashi or Tosafot!

All rights reserved and reprinted from an article in the Yiddishe Heim by LYO in L'chaim #405.


Beis Iyar, 5777

What Do They Look Like?
Segment 4 of 5

Now that we have established that Torah accepts the possibility of extraterrestrial life, let's explore what such life might look like.

Some insights on the appearance of life on other planets can be gleaned from Sefer HaBris, authored by R. Pinchas Eliyahu Horowitz of Vilna (1765-1821)1.

R. Pinchas writes that according to the belief of certain scientists, the stars and planets are quite similar to Earth, featuring mountains, valleys, and oceans, and inhabited by humans, animals, and plants. In particular, he cites the view of the astronomer Johannes Hevelius (1611-1687) in his work Selenographia, who portrays the moon as appearing much the same way as Earth.

R. Pinchas dismisses this notion, and describes the foolishness of this view by way of a mashal: A European merchant once traveled to a distant land. While there, he left a mirror near a mountain adjacent to a vast forest, and forgot to reclaim it. Sometime later, a tribesman discovered the mirror and looked inside. To his great surprise, he saw a forest in the background and a dark-skinned man who looked just like him! He foolishly concluded that the mountain was hollow and contained a large forest within it, inhabited by men similar in appearance to him!

If the inhabitants of these worlds are exactly like us, argues R. Pinchas, why did Hashem create them on separate planets and not on our world? Hashem surely could have created a single world large enough to encompass them all! Since Hashem created numerous stars and planets, we must say they are each unique, and their inhabitants are likewise distinctive and vastly different from those on this planet. Even ocean creatures and land creatures are worlds apart; how much more so life on other planets!

[Interestingly, R. Pinchas also proves this by saying that if life on other planets is similar to life on Earth, the creatures of Mercury, the closest planet to the sun, would die from the intense heat or become blind from the sun's rays, and the creatures of Saturn, the farthest visible planet from the sun, would expire from the extreme cold. It should be noted that modern science has yet to discover life on these planets, although there is speculation that life may exist on one or more of Saturn's many moons.]

R. Pinchas concludes that creatures on other worlds are fashioned from a type of form and matter that is superior than our own. In direct contrast to worldly creatures, where each individual passes on and only the species is perpetuated, these creatures do not expire and enjoy a continued existence.

So much for the physical appearance of extraterrestrial life. But what about their mental and emotional makeup? Are they intelligent creatures with free will who possess the ability to make decisions? Were they given commandments to fulfill, just as we must follow Torah and mitzvos?

To be continued bli neder...
Source: Sefer Habris, Section 1, 3:2-4

_______

1. For more on this author, see the accounts of the Frierdiker Rebbe (Sefer HaToldos Admor Hazaken, Vol. 2, p. 541) and R. Itche der Masmid (Reb Mendel, p. 202).

"Torah and Continued Good Health" Beis Iyar, 5777

.. We find ourselves now in the days preceding [Shavuos, the festival of] receiving the Torah, which brings healing to the world as a whole and the Jewish people - the receivers of the Torah - in particular.

In light of that which is known - that in a more particular sense we receive the Torah anew every day, as emphasized by the fact that the phrase "Giver of the Torah" is in present tense - we understand that a Jew must be healthy and whole each and every day. In the words of the Rambam: "Maintaining a healthy and whole body is an integral part of Divine service."

.. Surely I need not motivate you to influence your son to establish set times for the study of the inner portion of Torah (pnimiyus haTorah), which in our generation has been revealed in Toras HaChassidus.

Every increase in Torah and mitzvos, and surely adding to the study of pnimiyus haTorah, which is termed in the Zohar the "soul of Torah," greatly increases G-d's blessings for all of one's personal needs, both for the life of the body as well as for the life of the soul.

All rights reserved to chabad.org. From Igros Kodesh, Vol. XVII, p. 129
Originally adapted by S.B. Wineberg in his book Healthy in Body Mind & Spirit - Vol. 1


Yud Alef Nissan, 5777

Don't Forget your Purpose!

In military training, it is to be imagined that they cover many details about your strengths, your weapons strengths, your enemies' strengths fighting strategies and the terrain. It is however also fair to assume that there are several cardinal principles which they keep on emphasizing and repeating; perhaps to remember your purpose and your capabilities.

Anyone who recognizes a masterpiece will see that the Tanya lays out in a fascinating orderly fashion in the first thirteen chapters the prerequisites for the battle of a Beinoni. Helping you recognize who you are and who your enemies are, you and your enemies' strengths, along with the terrain on which the battle is taking place. Only afterwards does it follow with a battle plan along with a contingency plan.

While tangents are a regular in many seforim, there is however a tangent that really needs explanation. 

In chapter 4 the Alter Rebbe explains weaponry and objectives which includes all 613 mitzvos. Any mitzva we do is a levush and through it we connect to Hashem. But then he devotes a full chapter emphasizing the mitzva of Torah study explaining how it is greater than all other mitzvos.

Why the extra emphasis? And why now?

The objective of a Jew is to connect to Hashem in a physical world which conceals that connection.

It is therefore crucial to emphasize his ability and capability to do so. This is through in-clothing his neshama with Torah and mitzvos; they are one with Hashem even as it comes down in the physical world. This is due to Hashem putting his will into the Torah and Mitzvos. Thus, when one fulfills the Mitzvos he surrounds himself by Hashem's will.

Yet Torah study connects him to Hashem in the most significant and essential way. When one studies Torah he not only connects to the will of Hashem, he also internalizes the will of Hashem. This creates a unique and awesome oneness; connecting his actual nefesh elokis to elokus which is its sustenance. It is therefore internalized to the point that it becomes a part of him; allowing him to grasp elokus.

Now its understood why an entire chapter is dedicated to emphasizing Torah study; in the larger scheme of things it takes a central role.


Yud Alef Nissan, 5777

The Rebbe's View

In the last issue, we quoted a number of proofs cited in various sefarim that other worlds exist other than our own. However, all these proofs can be refuted if we say that these worlds are spiritual worlds. Perhaps this is why, when the Rebbe addressed the topic of extraterrestrial life, he did not cite any of these proofs, instead referencing to a Gemara that proves that actual beings dwell somewhere in outer space.

On the Shabbos following the first successful landing of man on the moon, the Rebbe held a special farbrengen to discuss the lessons that can be learned from this historic event. Among other topics, the Rebbe addressed the Torah view on extraterrestrial life.

The Rebbe prefaced his discussion by saying that lichorah there is no reason to discuss this topic, as it has no relevance to Torah and mitzvos. However, since if someone knows what to answer on this topic he may find it easier to influence another Jew to put on tefillin, keep Shabbos, or eat kosher, he will therefore address the issue.

The Rebbe brings a proof from a possuk in Shoftim, in the song of Devorah (Shoftim 5:23). Devorah says: "Cursed is Meroz, says the angel of Hashem; cursed are its inhabitants, for they did not come to the assistance of Hashem [to fight against Sisra's army]." The Gemara (Moed Katan 16a) offers two interpretations for the word Meroz: "Some say it is the name of an important individual, and others say it is the name of a star." (The very stars fought with Sisra-see Shoftim 5:20).

Now, the possuk continues, "cursed are its inhabitants." If Meroz is the name of a star, this means that this star is inhabited!

[It should be noted that Rabbeinu Chananel (Moed Katan ad loc.) explains that the star's "inhabitants" are the small stars adjacent to Meroz. However, the Rebbe explains that the term "inhabitants" refers to people, not stars.

Another way to explain this verse might be that the inhabitants are humans who dwell on this world, underneath this star. However, this explanation is incorrect, because that would mean that only a small group of people-those who didn't join the war against Sisra-lived under that star. This would contradict the Gemara that says (Pesachim 94a) that the entire civilization dwells underneath the space of just one star.]

The Rebbe addressed the topic of extraterrestrial life on a number of other occasions as well.

A few years before the above farbrengen, a certain individual asked the Rebbe if Torah supports the view that life exists on other planets. In a letter dated 26 Marcheshvan, 5726, the Rebbe answered that since this question has no relevance to the day-to-day life of a Jew, there is no clear-cut psak din on the matter, and there are various opinions about it.

A few weeks after NASA's Viking 1 lander touched down on Mars's surface, an individual from Milan asked the Rebbe about the Torah view on extraterrestrial life. In a letter dated Rosh Chodesh Elul, 5736, the Rebbe replied that since the entire universe was created so that Bnei Yisroel can fulfill the Torah, it follows that the planet Earth, which is where the Torah was given, is the primary purpose of Creation. However, this does not mean that life cannot exist elsewhere as well, which is why we find differences of opinion among chachmei yisroel on the matter.

In the early 1970s, Dr. Velvl Greene was working with NASA to search for life on Mars. When he was told that this pursuit was contrary to the Torah, he asked the Rebbe if this was true. The Rebbe answered: "You should look for life on Mars, and you should keep looking for life on Mars. If you don't find it, then keep looking elsewhere, and do not stop looking, because to sit here in this world and say there is no life elsewhere is to put a limit around what G-d can do. And nobody can do that!"

It seems that all that's left now is to identify which star is Meroz and send a spaceship there. But what type of creatures might we find? Are there any Torah sources that provide clues to what extraterrestrial life might look like?

To be continued bli neder... (third installment of five)

Sources: Sichah of Shabbos Parshas Devarim, 5729. Sefer Habris, Section 1, 3:3. Moreh Ledor Navuch, Vol. 3, p. 90. Nitzutzei Or, p. 75. Chabad.org/2436891

"Torah - Particularly Chitas - Is the Vessel For Receiving All Divine Blessings Including Health" Yud Alef Nissan, 5777

I received your pidyon nefesh in which you ask that Divine mercy be aroused for you so that you should be in good health. I will read the pidyon nefesh at the holy resting place of my father-in-law, the Rebbe, for the fulfillment of your heart's desire for good in all that you require.

It is known that in order to receive blessings from on High, we must create here below, [i.e., in this physical world,] the proper vessels into which these blessings will flow. Torah is the [most appropriate] vehicle for receiving any and all blessings.

I therefore suggest that you take upon yourself - bli neder - the observance of the three daily lessons [known as Chitas], established by my father-in-law, the Rebbe, an observance that applies to all Anash, our chassidic brotherhood.

They are: the daily portion of Tehillim as divided by the days of the month, recited following the morning prayers; the daily section of the weekly Torah portion - on Sunday, from the beginning of the portion to Sheni, on Monday from Sheni to Shelishi, and so on; and Tanya, as divided by the days of the year.

Observance of the above will surely serve as a fit vehicle to draw down and receive G-d's blessings.

All rights reserved to chabad.org. From Igros Kodesh, Vol. V, p. 51
Originally adapted by S.B. Wineberg in his book Healthy in Body Mind & Spirit - Vol. 1

"Super Food" for Yud Gimmel Nissan - All New Content
Yud Nissan, 5777

The Rebbe encourages us to learn the works of a Rebbe in Nigleh and Chassidus on his Yom Hilula, and to learn (at least one perek) Mishnayos beginning with the letters of his name. Yagdil Torah compiled a publication with Mishnayos and selected pieces of the Tzemach Tzedek's Torah. The publication will be available in local shuls, at our office and on our website.

The publication marking Yud Gimmel Nissan (the Yom Hilula of the Tzemach Tzedek) includes the full Mishnayos and easily accessible learning material and sections in English. It also includes stories of the Tzemach Tzedek.

Click here to download the Yud Gimmel Nissan Publication.

All new content! This publication will bring Beis Nissan to life
Rosh Chodesh Nissan, 5777

The Rebbe encourages us to learn the works of a Rebbe in Nigleh and Chassidus on his Yom Hilula, and to learn (at least one perek) Mishnayos beginning with the letters of his name. Yagdil Torah compiled a publication with Mishnayos and selected pieces of the Rebbe Rashab's Torah. The publication will be available in local shuls, at our office and on our website.

The publication marking Beis Nissan (the Yom Hilula of the Rebbe Rashab) includes the full Mishnayos. Keep an eye out for easily accessible learning material and sections in English. It also includes stories of the Rebbe Rashab.

Click here to download the Beis Nissan Publication.

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