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Guard Your Eyes
Heichal Halimmud



Drop some coins each morning into the Yagdil Torah פושקא located in 770.
Pushka location: Walk down the main aisle toward the doors, it is on your  on the right side at shoulder height.

Chalukas Hashas 5773   Giving has never been easier

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Kovetz Limmud Vov Tishrei Daled Tishrei 5776

On Vov Tishrei we mark the Yom Hillulah of Rebbetzin Chana. The Rebbe encouraged us to learn from her ways for she was a true paradigm of an "Eizer K'negdo. This updated publication includes stories from the Rebbetzin's life, as well as a full selection of chapters of Mishnayos that begin with the letters of her name.

The publication will be available in local shuls, at the Heichalei Halimmud, and at our office.

Click here to download the Kovetz Limmud for Vov Tishrei.
For Russian version Click here.

Chof Zayin Elul, 5775

"Get these rocks off my back!"

"Let me explain;

"Where I come from in Brooklyn these rocks that I just took off your back are actually worth, say half a billion. They are called jewelry. But because you are here in this remote part of Bangladesh you are not really aware of what they are. You just feel the weight and don't appreciate the value.

"If you were Jewish I would say it's very similar to Torah - it's very precious but in our dense world of materialism unfortunately it is at times seen as an annoying weight. That is why at times we have Tzaddikim who conceptually come from a different universe - a little like Brooklyn is a different universe for you - and tell us about the true worth of torah."


Chof Zayin Elul, 5775

In the 1920s, the use of automobiles had yet to become widespread, and the bicycle was a common method of transportation in many countries. This was true of the countries of North Africa as well, where numerous Sephardic communities flourished at the time. It was not uncommon to find cyclists, both Jewish and lehavdil non-Jewish, riding their bicycles down the street.

This instigated a question for the Jews of Medenine, a town in southern Tunisia. May a bicycle be rented to a non-Jew on Erev Shabbos? Riding a bicycle on Shabbos is equivalent to carrying in a reshus harabim and is therefore a melachah. May one rent out a bike when it is certain that the goy will ride it on Shabbos?

Rejected Chof Zayin Elul, 5775

"A time to act for Hashem; they have rejected Your Torah.".

I have seen an Aggadah that explains this possuk as follows: An idle, relaxed person who occasionally studies Torah has rejected the bris [between Hashem and the Yidden], because a person who has time on his hands must toil in the study of Torah at all hours of the day. [This is the meaning of the possuk: 'עת לעשות לה, He who acts for Hashem on occasion, הפרו תורתך, has rejected Your Torah.]

Tehilim 119:126 with Rashi


Yud Gimmel Elul, 5775

POPULAR NAMES

Moshe Shlomo, a village merchant, was a simple, good-hearted person, as was his wife Rivka.  Although they had been married for fifteen years they didn't have any children.

Many times during that decade and a half, Moshe Shlomo had gone to the Baal Shem Tov and entreated him to pray for them to have children. The Baal Shem Tov always showered him with blessings-for wealth, for long life, for health, for happiness-but never for what he so dearly hoped to hear.

Ten more years went by. The Baal Shem Tov's blessings all came to fruition. Moshe Shlomo's business affairs prospered and expanded. The couple, however, grew even more unhappy. They still had no children, and no encouragement from the Rebbe.

One day, they both went to see him. "Why do you two look so sad?" asked the Baal Shem Tov. Hasn't G-d blessed you with great prosperity, good health, and pleasant dispositions? And you have made the most of these blessings to do many mitzvos and good deeds."

"It may be true, all that you say," they both answered, "but still, we have no children. What do we need all of this wealth for?" They burst into tears. "After 120, there will be no inheritor and no one to remember us."

The Baal Shem Tov did not respond directly. He simply said, "Tomorrow I'm leaving on a little journey with a few of my students. Why don't you two come along also?"

They were surprised by the invitation but they quickly agreed. The travelers set out the next morning. For two days they were on the road, until finally they arrived at a certain town. After a short rest, the Baal Shem Tov suggested that they all go out and have a look around.

As they walked, they came across a bunch of children playing in the sand. The Baal Shem Tov went over to them and said to the nearest one, "What's your name?"

Six of the little boys were named Boruch Moshe, while most of the rest were Boruch or Moshe or one of those two names in combination with another. They went into a few more schools, and also a yeshiva that had students from all the surrounding villages, and found the same pattern of names. Not only that, whatever girls they encountered along the way were mostly named Brocha Leah, or one of those names singly or in combination with another.

By now it was time for the afternoon Mincha prayer. The men went into a shul. As soon as the minyan ended, the Baal Shem Tov asked one of the local men why all the children of the town had the same names. The man answered obligingly that he would be happy to tell them the whole story.


Yud Gimmel Elul, 5775

Although sugar looks quite similar to salt in color and texture, the taste it provides is extremely different. Does this mean that it belongs to a different category, or is it perhaps to be viewed as a salt derivative? The practical ramifications of this question are twofold. First of all, can a korban be "salted" with sugar? And second, if a piece of chicken or meat was accidentally "salted" with sugar instead of salt, is it kosher?

The first question was asked by the students of R. Yaakov Chagiz (1620-1674), the Rosh Yeshivah of Yeshivas Beis Yaakov in Yerushalayim, at one of the weekly erev Shabbos question-and-answer sessions he conducted with them. R. Yaakov asserts that sugar is undoubtedly a type of salt. Just as there are both sweet and sour lemons, oranges, and pomegranates, so too there is salt that is salty and there is salt that is sweet. The defining quality of salt is its ability to preserve, a characteristic present in sugar as well.

But considering sugar a type a salt doesn't mean that it can always be sprinkled on a korban.

The Book of Life Yud Gimmel Elul, 5775

The Zohar teaches us that the Torah and the name of Hashem are one; similarly, the Gemara says that the entire Torah consists of "the names of Hashem." Since the names of Hashem include both the levels of chessed and gevurah, it follows that the Torah possesses these two levels as well.

The Torah is called Adam, and the 248 mitzvos asei and 365 mitzvos lo saaseh are the source of a Yid's neshamah. Accordingly, when a Yid learns Torah sincerely and connects his neshamah with the Torah, he will also receive these two levels of chessed and gevurah.

This is expressed in his ability to bring about both death and life. As the Gemara (Shabbos 88b) explains the possuk (Mishlei 8:6),"Listen, for I will speak noble things": "Just as a nobleman has the ability to end a life or keep someone alive, so do the words of Torah have the ability to bring about death and life." This means that through the Torah, talmidei chachamim have the abilityto bring about death and life.

Degel Machanei Ephraim, Bamidbar 21:14


Chof Tes Av, 5775

Add in the Golf

Riing,

Hello, you have reached Megushem Spa and Resorts how can I help?

Yes actually please also add the golf package.

That's it?

Yes, thanks... Click

Wow; he just keeps on calling to improve his vacation. What can you expect; it's the center of his life.

Processing, processing...

Now I understand what the Baal Hatanya means that Kvius itim means binefesh. The amount of time I spend learning doesn't have to be as much as time as I spend working. What counts is that it's the center of life. If that means an hour in the morning and hour in the evening vs. an 8 hour work day, it doesn't mean it's not the most important thing. Like the example with vacation, most people don't vacation for the majority of the year, but like with the not such rare example above - it can still be the center of life.


Chof Tes Av, 5775

Salt plays an important role in various areas of yiddishkeit. In addition to dipping bread and challah in it, it is a mitzvas asei to douse every korban sacrificed on the mizbei'ach with salt, and chicken and meat must be salted to remove the blood contained within and allow it to be eaten.

Although sugar looks quite similar to salt in color and texture, the taste it provides is extremely different. Does this mean that it belongs to a different category, or is it perhaps to be viewed as a salt derivative?

There are two practical ramifications of this question. First of all, can a korban be "salted" with sugar? And second, if a piece of chicken or meat was accidentally "salted" with sugar instead of salt, is it kosher?