Gourmet Butcher

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialise correctly.

MinkAd.swf

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialise correctly.

Cowen Ad

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialise correctly.

Oraita Ad

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialise correctly.

Essel Ad

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialise correctly.

Guard Your Eyes
Heichal Halimmud



Drop some coins each morning into the Yagdil Torah פושקא located in 770.
Pushka location: Walk down the main aisle toward the doors, it is on your  on the right side at shoulder height.

Chalukas Hashas 5773   Giving has never been easier

All Headlines



Aleph Av, 5775

Very Picky

I don't want to start a fight with shadchanim etc. however there is room for the notion that you want to find someone who has all the qualities on your list. Your thinking, "hey, it would be nice if I can find a shidduch who has all that it speaks about in the aishes chayil passage".

Actually there sort of is!

In Rashi, pshuto shel mikra, he explains all of Aishes Chayil as it applies to the study of Torah. While we definitely recommend marriage and choosing someone practical etc. if there is something perfect that you want to have to do with - learning Torah is your address.


Aleph Av, 5775

A group of yidden in seventeenth-century Europe would gather together every day for a shiur in the Rif. The Rif quotes the portions of the Gemara which are relevant to practical halachah and points to the opinions which should be followed. Learning this sefer is helpful in providing the relevant halachos that should be inferred from the various sugyos of Shas, and it was for this reason that the group chose this sefer as the topic of their study.

As the months passed, the group saw progress in their studies, and they covered the Rif on many masechtos. As they neared the completion of the entire sefer, they began to consider a date for the upcoming siyum. (Although they hadn't concluded a masechta of Gemara, they were certain that a siyum could be made upon completion of the entire Rif, quite an impressive achievement in its own right.)

It was the month of Tamuz, 5454 (1694), and the members of the group considered delaying the last few lines of the sefer and the subsequent siyum until after Rosh Chodesh Menachem Av. This would enable them to utilize the occasion to eat meat and drink wine*, normally forbidden during the nine days. Were they allowed to do so, or were they required to conclude the sefer and make the siyum at the first possible opportunity?

_____
*The Chabad minhag is not to eat meat and drink wine even if a siyum was made.

The Entire Mind Aleph Av, 5775

"I hate [foreign] thoughts, but I love Your Torah." Earlier the possuk says, "How I love your Torah; it is my speech the entire day." We see that [Dovid Hamelech] did not speak about anything else other than Torah. The possuk adds here that he would not even consider any thought other than the thought of Torah. Since he loved Torah so much, his entire mind was dedicated to it, and he abhorred allowing any other thought to enter his heart.

Malbim, Tehillim 119:113


Tes Zayin Tammuz, 5775

The Identifying Fruit

A wealthy man by the name of Elimelech received many honors in the shul of the Rebbe, Rabbi Chaim of Antunia. He had one of the important seats in the front, facing the congregation, near the Rebbe's own chair.

For his part, Elimelech had great respect for the Rebbe. He would always bow his head before him, and contribute generously to the spectrum of charitable causes that the Rebbe maintained.

The chassidim, however, mostly did not think so highly of Elimelech, despite the affection the Rebbe openly displayed towards him. They suspected that his generous good deeds indicated only a superficial piety, and that at home he was not as religious as he appeared in public. Sharper tongues said that he was influenced by the so-called Enlightenment movement and its innovations and that this had already weakened his Fear of Heaven.

But now, an uncrossable line had been crossed: his son had enrolled in their high school, something no youth from any religious family had yet dared to do, never mind one from a chassidic home and associated with the Rebbe, no less.


Tes Zayin Tammuz, 5775

Sir Herbert Samuel, a non-practicing Jew, was the first High Commissioner of the British Mandate of Palestine in the 1920s. These unique circumstances led to an interesting halachic question. First of all, was his position as High Commissioner prominent enough to warrant the berachah said when seeing a king? And second, if a berachah should indeed be recited, should it be the berachahsaid on a Jewish king (shechalak mikvodo lirei'av), being that he was Jewish, or the one said on a non-Jewish king (shenasan mikvodo lebasar vedam), since he was a representative of the British government?

This question was addressed by R. Chalfon Moshe HaKohen, a rabbi in Djerba, Tunisia. (Apparently, Sir Samuel traveled abroad as part of his duties and visited this Tunisian island as well.) R. Moshe cited a similar query that was presented to the Radvaz, whether a berachah should be recited upon seeing the Pasha of Egypt, appointed to the position by the Sultan of the Ottoman Empire.

The Radvaz, in turn, makes reference to a teshuvah penned by R. Avraham Av Beis Din, which deals with reciting a berachah on the local rulers of medieval Europe. R. Avraham rules that one can recite the berachah, being that these rulers had the power to punish and even kill as they saw fit, with no one to overturn their decisions.

However, a distinction can be made between these local rulers and a Pasha.

I Am Not Interested Tes Zayin Tammuz, 5775

In answer to your question . . . regarding a remedy that will arouse an enjoyment to learn and to daven with kavanah.

The solution to this is as Chazal tell us, "If you have toiled and have not found [success], do not believe it." Accordingly, the matter is in your hands, and when you will desire to daven with kavanah and learn with diligence you will ultimately succeed.

The same is true regarding all the trials that may surface in one's path. One should not be affected by them and should overcome them, and when truly desires to do so, he will succeed.

Igros Kodesh, vol. 18, p. 206


Beis Tammuz, 5775

Ben Olam Habah

The Gemara says that whoever learns halachos every day is assured to be "a son of Olam Haba." Why does the Gemara use the expression "a son of Olam Haba?"

I once heard the following explanation: just as a son feels comfortable in his home and goes about as he pleases, a person who learns halachos every day will be able to move about freely through all the heichalos in Olam Haba.

Perhaps we can explain the reason he will merit such a reward as follows:

When a person learns a halachah, he becomes connected to the tzadik who authored this halachah. However, a halachah is often associated with numerous tzadikim. For example, a person may learn a halachah in the Alter Rebbe's Shulchan Aruch, which is based on the ruling of the mechaber, who extrapolated it from two Rishonim, who took it from the opinion of Abaye, which is based on a story about Shimon ben Shetach, who acted according to a teaching he heard from Shimon HaTzadik. When a person learns a halachah every day, he connects to a multitude of tzadikim and will merit to enter their heichalos in Olam Haba.


Beis Tammuz, 5775

Sir Herbert Samuel was the first High Commissioner of the British Mandate of Palestine, ruling the country from 1920 to 1925. What was unusual about his sovereignty was the fact that he was a Jew. Having been raised in an Orthodox home, he demonstrated strong feelings toward his brethren and was heavily involved in Jewish communal problems, although he did not actually practice his religion.

These unique circumstances led to an interesting halachic question. There is a special berachah that is said upon seeing a king. If the king is Jewish, the berachah concludes with the words shechalak mikvodo lirei'av ("who has apportioned from His glory to those who fear Him"), while if he is a gentile king, it concludes with shenasan mikvodo lebasar vedam ("who has imparted from His glory to flesh and blood"). What berachah, if any, should be recited upon seeing Sir Samuel?

The question is twofold: First of all, was his position as High Commissioner prominent enough to warrant the berachah said on a king? And second, if a berachah should indeed be recited, should it be the berachah said on a Jewish king, being that he was Jewish, or the one said on a non-Jewish king, since the citizens under his rule were predominantly non-Jewish?

Even when... Beis Tammuz, 5775

The reason Hashem gave us the Torah was not to place it on the shelf as a precious and polished item and take pleasure in the fact he has a beautiful sefer torah safeguarded in a revered location. Torah is from the word hora'ah-lesson; this means that the Torah teaches a person how to act in his daily life. A person should not only follow the instructions of the Torah when he is in yeshivah or shul and joins a shiur, but also when he eats, drinks, and is involved in business; even then it should be clear to whoever meets him that he is a Torah yid who is familiar with Shulchan Aruch. The fact that he learned Shulchan Aruch until his Bar Mitzvah is not enough, and neither is the fact that he learned it until his chasunah or even afterward, when he was still supported by his father-in-law. Even later, when a person must work to support himself, he must continue to study Torah daily.

Sichah of Shavuos 5729


Yud Ches Sivan, 5775

Scheduling Problems

There was once a Torah scholar named Yosef who lived in the city of Nikopol, in northern Bulgaria. Although Rabbi Yosef's main interest and joy in life was the study of Torah, he insisted on supporting his family through the sweat of his own labor. To that end, he entered into a business partnership with an acquaintance and opened a store.

The division of labor would prove to be problematic. R. Yosef's daily schedule was as follows: After early morning prayers, he would go to the study hall for several hours; thus he never arrived at the store until noon. His partner, who had already been dealing with customers for several hours, eventually began to resent this arrangement. He respected his partner's diligence in Torah study, but at the same time needed help with the practical aspect of running a business.

R. Yosef realized that his partner was right and remained silent. "But what can I do," he thought to himself, "if my love of Torah is so strong?"

One morning, someone in the study hall raised a particularly complex question in Torah law. The heated discussion that ensued lasted for hours as all the scholars in the study hall attempted to answer it. By the time R. Yosef looked up from his volume of Talmud it was already late in the afternoon.

When R. Yosef finally arrived at the store his partner was furious. "That's it!" he fumed. "I've had enough of this joint venture!"